Roaming On Road Trips

For years, the girls have been trying to organise a weekend away in the Hunter Valley but our busy and conflicting schedules – coupled with the fact that when we last tried, our accommodation went into liquidation the weekend before we arrived – made it next to impossible. Until last weekend.

We finally locked in three days we were all free and set our sights on a morning/afternoon exploring Pokolbin, followed by a couple of nights in a beautiful retreat to enjoy some quiet time with our newly purchased wine, cheese, and chocolate. Reality actually exceeded expectation and we had a wonderful time.

Leaving bright and early on Saturday morning, we made the following stops before heading to our home away from home for the weekend:

– Mooney Mooney Rest Area
– Maitland (for food supplies)
Hunter Valley Chocolate Company
McGuigan Cellar Door
Hunter Valley Cheese Company
Hunter Valley Smelly Cheese (which was also our lunch stop)
Tempus Two Cellar Door
De Bortoli Cellar Door

I honestly cannot recommend Smelly Cheese highly enough. While it’s tiny and absolutely crammed with people, they have an amazing selection of cheese, condiments, cured meats, oils, crackers, etc. We spent almost $200 on things almost exclusively for the weekend. No regrets about the $25.00 sliver of French brie, it was AMAZING.

We stayed at Donnybrook Eco Retreat, in the Hillview/Valleyview tents, and it was absolutely perfect. Not only was it less than 30 minutes from welcoming that we didn’t actually leave again for the whole weekend. We’ve been glamping several times and this was easily one of our favourites to date, the attention to detail and homely touches made all the difference.

Sweeping views of the surrounding countryside; a wicker swing chair; large and comfortable beds (with chocolates on each pillow!); a gas barbecue; a fire pit (with wood and kindling provided); ensuite bathrooms for each tent; a deck area with outdoor furniture; and (my favourite) a yurt between the two tents which served as a kitchen or communal dining area. The two bar fridges came fully stocked with fresh farm eggs, bacon, jam, butter, milk, juice, pancake batter, and delicious homemade chocolate slice!

One of my favourite parts was waking up to the sounds of birds echoing through the valley – such a great incentive to get up and enjoy the sunrise. And the beautiful colours at dusk made for some excellent reasons to go exploring. Definitely made this Girls Weekend well worth the wait.

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A Saturday on the South Coast

Every now and then, I’ll tag along with one of my friends who likes exploring areas of Sydney (and beyond) that have randomly popped up in one of her social feeds. We never know if the effort is going to be worthwhile but, at the very least, the adventure will make for a great story.

One Saturday, she picked me up at 5am and didn’t drop me home until 7pm. Everything in between was soaking up the south coast of NSW, including sunrise, beaches, hikes, cliffs, rocks, ocean, waterfalls, and sunset, as well as some of the most beautiful roads and scenery:

– Sea Cliff Bridge
– Port Kembla beach
– Nellie’s Glen
– Kiama Blowhole
– Bombo

We hugged the coast, we went inland; we saw the ocean stretch on for miles, we saw trees stretch up for metres; we saw the ocean creating salty spray and crashing waves on the rocks, we saw freshwater winding its way through the forest and cascading down in beautiful waterfalls; we saw the sunrise out of the ocean, we saw the sunset behind the mountains.

It’s hard to believe that just 60-90 minutes out of Sydney lies such varied and stunning scenery. From the beautiful engineering feat of the Sea Cliff Bridge to the gorgeous colours from a sunset at Bombo quarry, this was a gorgeous day. Who says you can’t wanderlust after your own backyard?

Just Can’t Wait To Get On The Road Again

The humble road trip was a staple of my childhood. We saw most of rural NSW on three or four day excursions that would have us staying in different towns each night. We’d leave early in the morning, my brother and I fighting for control of the fold-down tray table in the backseat as my parents tuned us out with a mixtape, and the route was determined more by whim than anything else.

We had a rough plan but very rarely pre-booked accommodation, preferring to stop when we’d had enough driving for the day and/or when we found towns that appealed to us. It was an adventurous way of traveling (something I’ve only realised in my adult years) and meant we uncovered some wonderful places that we wouldn’t have found on a road map or in an information brochure.

Some of my favourite memories growing up were on these breaks and I’m sure that’s why I still hold road trips with such reverence. It also means I now travel in quite a similar way. In recent years, we’ve done road trips of Tasmania’s east coast, America’s Route 66, Victoria’s Great Ocean RoadΒ  and New Zealand’s South Island. They varied in terms of planning detail but each one had that sense of adventure, of embracing the road less traveled because it might just lead to the highlight of your holiday.